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Asgard Plateau – The Norse Secrets of The Blue Mountains

Asgard Plateau – The Norse Secrets of The Blue Mountains

Not far from the Upper Blue Mountains town of Mt Victoria lies the Asgard Plateau, an area of the escarpment tucked in between the upper reaches of the Grose River and the pretty Victoria Creek.

While not a large area, there are many interesting features and excellent lookouts that can be visited. Most popular is the well signposted walk from Victoria Falls lookout at the end of the road, down to the spectacular Victoria Falls.

However, many of the best views in the area come from the five heads of Asgard Plateau – Odin Head, Asgard Head, Thor Head, Valhalla Head and Ikara Head – which were named by early bushwalker and conservationist Myles Dunphy, mostly after gods and places from Norse mythology.

Explorers TomRachel and friends shared with us a recent trip they did in this incredible part of the Blue Mountains. Read on to enjoy what they experienced over the two days.

Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Making your way across areas of the swamp is made easier with some handy logs like this, but don’t rely on it, you may get wet feet.

Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
A lookout across from Ikara Head. Some very big cliffs here. Remember, don’t get too close to the edges. Please get back in one piece 🙂
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Crossing the swamp to Girraween Cave. Make lots of noise so any snakes can sense you coming and get out of your way. Sorry, we don’t want to put a downer on things but…
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
The Australian bush can be an incredibly dense area to hike in. Knowing where you are and where you’re going is critical in these areas.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Happy hikers!
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Getting over some of the rocky areas requires sure footing and good balance.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
The Lost Pillar. Can you see it?
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Making your way down can be tricky. Go steady. Try to have three points of contact at all times. Be safe out there 🙂
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Incredible views from the top!
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Asgard Swamp from above.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Interesting rock formations on Thor Head. Could this be Mjölnir?
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Looking across from Thor Head to Burramoko Head.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Some deep rock crevasses. Make sure you can get back if you do try to jump across. It’s OK, nobody was lost on this trip.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Thor Head cliffs.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Thor Head. Impressive.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
A nice camp spot by a large pagoda. Getting that sweet spot is part of the fun.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Yummy! Dinner time and guess what was on the menu?
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
FONDUE!!!!
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Mackenzie Coal Mine. Abandoned. Enter at your own risk.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Looking out from inside the mine.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
A lookout over Victoria Falls.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Victoria Falls.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Grose Valley. Not gross, obviously.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
Banksia.
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
A BIG drop!!!
Asgard Plateau blue mountains hiking
That first coffee in the morning, brewing on the camp fire is always a special moment.

Our explorers met up with some fellow friends who have been including their young one into the fantastic world of exploring. By the looks of it, she is already a seasoned hiker. Very cute.

Know What You’re Doing

Both Tom and Rachel and the others in this party are all experienced bushwalkers and know how to navigate using map and compass.

We highly recommend only going to these areas with an experienced walker, who knows the area and/or can navigate with map and compass. Or why not join a bush walking club where you can experience these areas for yourself in a safe and fun environment. You will have the opportunity to learn skills such as bushcraft and navigation, amongst others. The knowledge you gain will broaden you adventure possibilities, enlighten your understanding of the bush and keep you safe.

If you want to take your children hiking, then start with small steps. Don’t go big on the first attempt. We shared some tips on taking children hiking recently. Don’t worry, the parents of this little one are very experienced hikers and navigators and this was on the easy going part of the trip.

Thanks to Tom and Rachel for sharing this great trip with us. There are so many incredible places to see out there, and right on our doorstep.

The original post can be found here along with an impressive list of other adventures these guys have both been on together.

All photos: ©Tom Brennan

Opening words by Tom Brennan

Jason Lorch
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•
We are all in uncertain times with regard to COVID-19 and strong measures are being taken on all fronts to ‘flatten the curve’ and minimise the impacts on our society and economy. 
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One last thing - now is a time we should be conscious of riding well within our abilities so as to not risk placing unnecessary pressure on the health system at this uncertain juncture.

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